Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Eyes Wide Open


John 9:25
He replied, "Whether he is a sinner or not, I don't know.  One thing I do know.  I was blind but now I see!"

I'm aware before I go for my yearly eye exam with Dr. H. that the cataract in my left eye is getting worse.  I'm simply not seeing with my contacts the way I used to.  It's not what I want, not in the least, but it is happening all the same.  Dr. H. has always been up front with me that I, not he, will know when it's time to schedule the surgery to correct my vision.  So after I tell him I'm no longer comfortable driving in the dark as the oncoming headlights and even street lights cast a sinister glare, he has two words:

"It's time."

>Sigh<

Okay, folks, I'm a bit lot fearful of this inevitable procedure.  Even though my dear nephew, a seasoned eye doctor, has assured me that he would rather have someone perform cataract surgery on him than sit in the dentist chair any day, I'm not convinced.

Not yet.

And when the new contacts Dr. H. orders for me come in?  Wow!  Just wow!  I didn't realize until I put them in how blind I am, how much I am missing.  The world is crystal clear, the colors alive and vibrant, my depth perception improved in ways I never could have imagined.  Hey!  If the contacts work this well, why not put off the removal of the real nemesis?  I mean, how much worse can it possibly get?

My husband, Danny, provides a shot of reality.  "How much worse do you really want this to get until you do something about it and fix the problem for good?"

He's right.

>Sigh<

But I can't help but be apprehensive downright scared.  What if something goes wrong?  Then what do I do?  How can I live my life of writing/reading?  What about mobility?  How can I know for sure everything will turn out okay?

And I am reminded:  The blind man whom Jesus heals doesn't know, when confronted by the Pharisees, if Jesus is a sinner, but he chooses to trust the Lord anyway, declaring what he does know for sure.

I was blind, but now I see.

His sight is restored; his faith renewed.

And he has learned, with eyes wide open in gratitude, to place his life and future in the hands of Jesus.

I know I need to do the same.

How about you?

Amen.

20 comments:

  1. Jo had cataract surgery about 2 years ago. I have needed it for the past year but am waiting until October when i turn 65. That was the advice of my eye doctor. :) They tell me in the eye doc's office I am the first person they have seen so excited about having cataract surgery. I have worn glasses (translated coke bottles) since 4th grade. Thinner and lighter lens material has made it bearable, but cataract surgery will make it so much better that even if I still have to wear glasses they will be a remnant of their former selves. i can't wait!

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    1. Bill, I really needed your words of encouragement about this whole procedure. Sounds like Jo had no problems and it's obvious you are looking forward to it - I would be, too, had I been unable to wear contacts. My glasses are like coke bottles, too - Lol! Anyway, know your words here made me feel a whole lot better about the whole thing.
      Love and blessings!

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  2. It seems that cataract removal is a rite of passage for seniors nowadays. May you pass this signpost with aplomb.

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    1. Thank you, Roy! Yes, it seems this is our rite of passage as we age. Going to face the music!
      Love and blessings!

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  3. I'm right behind you, still in the "I'll know when it's time" stage. When a friend used specific examples to tell me what he couldn't see before the surgery and what he can see now, it made a big impression. Amazing to think that not so long ago, cataracts meant eventual blindness, and now fixing them is so routine.

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    1. It is amazing how routine this surgery has become, Galen, and so incredibly improved. I know I should be anxious for nothing, and am holding onto that thought. And thanks for sharing the encouraging words of your friend - it really helped!
      Love and blessings!

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  4. Martha, I love this. Thank you for sharing.

    First, because I am hearing impaired I can very much identify with this. When I got my hearing aids 6 years ago I was so excited by all of the things I can hear with them that I had been missing out on for so long.

    Second, at the end of this month I'll be having oral surgery done and I'm scared to death and so nervous! Thank you for the encouragement to keep my eyes on Jesus and remember He gives me the strength to do this,

    Marcie :-)

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    1. Oh, Marcie, I'm so gratified to know you found today's post encouraging as you face oral surgery at the end of the month. Any dental work is never fun, but I can truly understand how you are dreading this. Do keep your eyes on Jesus, my friend, and I will add you to my prayer list. Please let me know how it all turns out!
      Love and blessings!

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  5. Martha, I can completely understand your fears regarding all the "what ifs" regarding this procedure. (Honestly, I'm a mix of fearful and excited because I have a reasonably strong prescription for nearsightedness--good-bye to think lenses, contacts, and perhaps for needing any type of correction save reading glasses.)

    Like you, I'm learning to trust Jesus, because He has me in His hands. Moreover, I'm looking to Him for supernatural healing--I believe that it's very possible. What an amazing testimony that would be to my doctors!

    Love and blessings!

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    1. And I'll be so happy to pray with you for that supernatural healing, Kim! Yes, with God, all things are possible.
      I know I should be rejoicing over getting to NOT wear contacts ever again, and many of the comments here have steeled my nerves, so to speak. I'll just keep leaning into and trusting Jesus!
      Love and blessings!

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  6. Martha, Oh how I can relate to this one! The eye doctor is the one who spotted my mom's brain tumor (before a medical doctor). So, I kind of dreaded when my eye doc said he wanted to dilate my eyes. He did not see a thing wrong with other eye test—this is only a precaution. I still haven't done it! After reading your post, I'm going to trust Jesus and set up that appointment.
    Thanks! I'm always blessed by your writing.

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    1. Beckie, I'm so humbled to know that you are blessed by my writing as I am ever blessed by yours!
      Wow! An eye doctor detected your mother's brain tumor? That is nothing short of a miracle. As others like you have offered words of encouragement about this impending procedure, let your heart not be afraid. Knowing in time to make a positive difference in your quality of life is all important. Go in peace, and just do it! I'm scheduling my surgery as of tomorrow.
      Love and blessings!

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  7. I laughed at reading your eye chart by the way. I understand your resistance but think God was showing you with your reaction with the new contact how great it will be afterwards. I am a little behind you right now with one beginning in my left eyes so you may need to encourage me later on. LOL Praying for courage for you, dear friends

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    1. That eye chart was the best, Jean, wasn't it? I simply Googled images, and there it was, in plain and obvious sight. I beginning to think God likes puns and plays on words very much!
      My left eye is the culprit. It is scheduled to be addressed first. Usually, they tend to the other eye about a week later. Might be a time that I'm not blogging.
      And to be sure, when you decide it's time for your procedure, you can count on me for prayers, my friend. Comments like yours do give me the courage to press forward and relieve my sight burden for good.
      Love and blessings!

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  8. Cataract surgery seems to be a pretty simple procedure these days, with marvelous results! My parents both had it done years ago, and the results were almost miraculous...they didn't need glasses! I am sure you will be just fine...and you may not even need your contacts afterward! Praying God will give you the courage you need to just 'get er done' as they say in the country!

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    1. Thanks so much for the reassurance, Pamela. Everyone has been so encouraging, I'm really losing my fear about the whole procedure. Will trust that God will make it a wonderful, "eye-opening" experience!
      Love and blessings!

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  9. I can understand how concerned you are, but hopefully with all the reassurance you've received so far it should be well in the end. Stay blessed!

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    1. Yes, Blogoratti, the words of encouragement here have truly helped. I am blessed to have so many caring folks following my blog!
      Love and blessings!

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  10. Good reminder. Odd how eyes that work perfectly in this fallen world can see and be so blind to Truth. We see more with our souls and heart than we do our eyes, but I get the concern. It's why I never had the surgery to get rid of these contact lenses.

    Praying for you, sister.

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    1. Thanks so much for your prayers, Floyd, they mean a lot! And I agree that physical vision doesn't guarantee spiritual insight, and that is a shame, indeed.
      Love and blessings!

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